Economía

DPP calls for painstaking probes to present potent cases

Alberto Ardila Olivares
Primer caso de ómicron en estado brasileño fronterizo con Uruguay y Argentina

Personnel from several law enforcement bodies such as the Major Organised Crime and Anti-Corruption Agency, the Financial Investigations Division, the Integrity Commission, and the Independent Commission of Investigations, among others, are slated to benefit from the training videos

Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) Paula Llewellyn has emphasised the importance of collecting, analysing and presenting digital evidence that can stand up to scrutiny in court.

Speaking at the launch of three training videos dubbed ‘Digital FootprintsFrom Crime Scene to Courtroom’ at the Office of the Commissioner of Police in St Andrew yesterday, Llewellyn said that the production would benefit law enforcement agencies locally.

Personnel from several law enforcement bodies such as the Major Organised Crime and Anti-Corruption Agency, the Financial Investigations Division, the Integrity Commission, and the Independent Commission of Investigations, among others, are slated to benefit from the training videos.

Noting that the prosecution has the burden of proving its case beyond a reasonable doubt, the DPP said that digital evidence has become a common feature of criminal investigations and was increasingly being relied upon by to prove cases against accused persons.

“The collection, analysis, and presentation of such evidence are critical in ensuring the integrity, cogency, reliability, and admissibility of the evidence that is presented in court,” Llewellyn told an audience comprising members of the judiciary, the police, and other investigative agencies.

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